Atticus regularly publishes articles in law based publications throughout the US. Here are those most downloaded by our visitors and clients:

hire-slow-book-cover-smallNew! Hire Slow Fire Fast: A Lawyer’s Guide to Building a High Performance Team

By Mark Powers and Shawn McNalis

Read an excerpt (PDF)

 

article-family-lawyer-magazine-most-threatening-issuesNEW! The 5 Most Threatening Issues Facing Your Law Practice

By Mark Powers and Steve Riley, Practice Advisors
Original Publishing, Family Lawyer Magazine

Chart a course for the future of your family law practice by knowing the five most threatening issues facing the legal profession.

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article-from-mistmaker-to-rainmakerFrom Mistmaker to Rainmaker

By Amy Johnson Conner
Original Publishing Lawyers Weekly USA

Some people don’t need a personal trainer to get in shape or a counselor from Weight Watchers to help them shed those extra pounds – and some lawyers don’t need a coach to tone their rainmaking skills.

But if you’re not one of the lucky few who have marketing in his or her blood, Mark Powers believes he has the program for you. One part strategy, two parts action plan, the program provides the one key ingredient that every reluctant rainmaker needs – accountability.

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article-contact-management-softwareContact Management Software and Client Development

By Mark Powers and Shawn McNalis
Original Publishing Clearwater Bar

Rapport with referrals sources is built one conversation at a time. Like a string of pearls, each time you meet a prospective or an existing referral source and gather information about them, a new pearl is added to the strand. Once a certain number is reached, the relationship moves from acquaintance to friendship. Becoming friends with your referral sources is both personally and nancially rewarding, but requires an investment of time and energy as you learn about them and their lives.

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article-social-abritrageSocial Arbitrage: What does it have to do with marketing?

By Mark Powers and Shawn McNalis
Original Publishing Lawyers USA

Think of marketing as a game. A game in which the open flow of information – the constant exchange of ideas and exchange small gestures with those in your social network –add up to business success.

To play the game you follow this rule: When you meet someone during the course of business, you draw upon your knowledge, experience and connections to help them.And you do this with no expectation of the help being returned.

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article-making-the-most-of-holiday-marketingMaking the most of your marketing during the holidays

By Mark Powers and Shawn McNalis
Original Publishing Lawyers USA

In balmy south Florida, a determined real estate attorney with a good sense of humor donned a Santa suit and drove from office to office on Christmas Eve to deliver baskets brimming with cookies. Greeted by those he visited with raised eyebrows and peals of laughter, he made quite an impression.

Three states away Louisiana, a team of paralegals stood at the entrance to their corporate law firm and accepted wrapped toys for charity as the admission pass to their holiday open house. Inside, a student chef from a local culinary school sautéed shrimp at one of the many food stations setup around the firm to encourage circulation.The firm’s attorneys ushered their best referral sources and clients around the office while another student dressed as a waiter moved through the crowd with a tray of drinks held aloft.

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article-marketing-with-authenticityMarketing with Authenticity

By Mark Powers
Original Publishing Lawyers USA

In client development seminars and workshops I am often asked whether the most successful rainmakers are effective because of their personality and natural ability– or whether something else is at play.

These people are no doubt thinking of the rainmakers they’ve seen who navigate every social situation with ease and radiate such self-assurance new clients are continually drawn to them.

You, on the other hand, might be someone who is decidedly not the most comfortable person in unfamiliar social territory. You might experience apprehension when asked to market yourself because you don’t believe you’re a natural at marketing.

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article-the-art-of-asking-for-referralsThe Art of Asking for Referrals

By Mark Powers
Original Publishing Lawyers USA

Two years ago, Boston personal injury lawyer Russell Rosenthal adopted the practice of asking clients for referrals. It was a simple but powerful marketing tool that caused his client referrals to jump dramatically.

“At first, I was very reluctant to try this,” he said. “I was concerned that people would find it offensive. But once I found a comfortable way to mention it, no one seemed turned off at all. Soon, I made a habit of it and incorporated into most client conversations. It had a bigger impact than I imagined. In fact, referrals from my clients have increased over 200 percent.”

For Russell, this was a way to tap into a market that existed just beyond his reach – the family and friends of his past and present clients. Certainly, delivering quality service will garner a certain percentage of referrals: people who like you will tell others. But what about clients who like you, but forget about you when their grandmother needs a will or their neighbor needs to litigate against his employer? Would it really make a difference if you planted the seeds for potential referrals while you were still working with these clients?

According to Russell, it does.

Read entire article [PDF]

article-put-five-rainmaking-habits-to-workPut 5 Rainmaking Habits to Work for You

By Mark Powers
Original Publishing Family Advocate

See if you recognize your own marketing approach in the following description: When business is good,you’re scrambling to keep up with your caseload and not marketing at all. It is overwhelming enough to find yourself in a position that requires you to be a shoulder to cry on, a skilled mediator, a trial attorney, and firefighter simultaneously. But when business starts to fall off, a sense of panic creeps in and you desperately try to market yourself. Some of these marketing efforts pay off, the panic dies down, and the work begins to come in again.

So you stop marketing…until the next time. And the practice always seems as if it is in this cycle of stress and frustration…either too much production or never enough.

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article-never-stop-marketingNever Stop Marketing

By Mark Powers
Original Publishing Family Law Commentator/The Briefs

“Never stop marketing!” Those were my words to Marsha (not her real name), a Florida family law attorney whom I was coaching. Her question was, “When can I let up on the marketing?” Marsha had been following my golden rule for marketing a family law practice, which is three direct marketing contacts each week, and at least 20 good referral sources, to maintain a financially successful practice. And her practice was growing!

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article-need-referrals-dont-wait-for-a-fairy-godmotherNeed Referrals? Don’t Wait for a Fairy Godmother

By Judi Craig Ph.D., MCC
Original Publishing The Connecticut Law Tribune

Hands down, the single best way to get clients is to have them referred. Word-of-mouth marketing brings a potential client to an attorney, because someone he trusts has given him that lawyer’s name.

The problem is that most attorneys handle the referral process in a haphazard manner.They don’t develop the referral-generating skills or structures to create what is critical to client development: a referral system.Think what would happen to a lawyer’s

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article-the-law-firm-retreatLaw Firm Retreat: Ho-Hum or Yee-Haw?

By Judi Craig Ph.D., MCC
Original Publishing San Antonio Lawyer

Do you react to the announcement of the yearly firm retreat with less than excitement?

Kind of like, “Oh no, not another one!” Worse still, do you usually leave the retreat feeling that you’ve just wasted a perfectly good day or two?

Or perhaps you’ve had a different experience: You enjoyed yourself, had some pleasant down-time with your colleagues, ate some good food (probably too much!)—maybe even came away with a few good ideas. But reality hit when you walked into your office the next day to a full in-basket and poof!—all those good ideas were put aside for “when I have some time to do something with them.” Then a few months later, the materials covered with the dust of benign neglect, you searched for something you vaguely remembered, but couldn’t find it. If you did find it, you looked at those great notes you wrote next to the major points but couldn’t read your own writing.

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article-increasing-your-utilization-rateIncreasing Your Utilization Rate

By Judi Craig Ph.D., MCC
Original Publishing San Antonio Lawyer

Do you find yourself at the end of your workweek thinking “Where has all my time gone?” If I’m working this hard, why am I not making more money?”

The answer can be found in your utilization rate: the number of hours you billed divided by the number of hours you worked (including nights and weekends) over a set time period (weekly or monthly). The resulting percentage is an effective way of tracking just how productive you—and others in your firm—really are. Eighty percent means you’re being efficient. If the percentage is lower, you’re probably feeling overworked and underpaid. And you’re not using your time efficiently. But how can you raise that percentage?

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article-vacation-101-for-lawyersVacation 101 for Lawyers

By Sylvia Hsieh
Original Publishing Lawyers USA

Family law attorney Cynthia Swanson was flipping through a friend’s travel photos one day in 2005 when her friend offered her the chance of a lifetime.”We’re going to Africa next. Wanna come?””Africa? Yes!” Within three days, Swanson had purchased her plane tickets and committed thousands of dollars to a vacation she hadn’t really thought out. There was no turning back. Like many sole practitioners, Swanson, who has been practicing for 25 years, had never taken a real vacation, one where she would have no phone calls, no e-mails, no contact at all for two whole weeks.

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article-hourly-billing-the-democracy-of-the-deadHourly Billing: The Democracy of the Dead

By Ron Baker, Founder, VeraSage Institute

You are what you charge for. A business is defined by little else. Your price speaks volumes about your value proposition, more so than any other component of your firm’s marketing.

Yet law firms seem to believe they are defined by their “hourly rates.” It is as if we took our (and our firms’) collective intelligence, experience, judgment, training, wisdom, knowledge, and commoditized them into a one-dimensional hourly rate. From a marketing standpoint, this is a mistake. Once you understand that clients, emphatically, do not buy hours, it becomes self-evident that pricing by the hour is precisely the wrong measurement to use to ascertain the value created for the client.

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article-practicing-in-bad-economic-timesPracticing in Bad Economic Times

By Nora Riva Bergman
Original Publishing The Dock

“It is the heart that makes a man rich. He is rich according to what he is, not according to what he has.”- Henry Ward Beecher

Whether or not you agree that the country is in a recession, there’s no denying that we’re experiencing a downturn in the economy.While the economy has some effect on all law firms, it’s often solo and small firm practitioners who feel the pinch of tough economy more acutely than larger firms. So, how do you find the silver lining in the economic rain cloud hanging over our heads? We offer a few suggestions.

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